Development of Solid Particle Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Plants that Use Fluidized Bed Technology

Zhiwen Ma, Gregory Glatzmaier, Mark Mehos

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

54 Scopus Citations

Abstract

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory is developing a thermal energy storage (TES) system that uses solid particles as the storage medium for a concentrating solar power plant. This paper focuses on the particle-TES performance in terms of three efficiency metrics: first-law efficiency, second-law efficiency, and storage effectiveness. The paper presents the derivation of the efficiency expression and their application in assessing the particle-TES performance and design. The particle-TES system uses low-cost stable materials that withstand high temperature at a fraction of the cost of the salt and metal containment vessels for high-temperature TES. Cost analysis indicates that particle TES costs less than $10/kWhth, which is less than half the cost of the current molten-salt-based TES and just a fraction of liquid heat transfer fluid storage at a similar high temperature of >700°C, due to its low cost of storage medium and containment. The fluidized-bed TES can hold hot particles of > 800°C with >95% exergetic efficiency, storage effectiveness, and thermal efficiency.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages898-907
Number of pages10
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
EventInternational Conference on Solar Power and Chemical Energy Systems, SolarPACES 2013 - Las Vegas, NV, United States
Duration: 17 Sep 201320 Sep 2013

Conference

ConferenceInternational Conference on Solar Power and Chemical Energy Systems, SolarPACES 2013
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityLas Vegas, NV
Period17/09/1320/09/13

NREL Publication Number

  • NREL/CP-5500-60400

Keywords

  • Concentrating solar power
  • Gas/solid two-phase flow
  • Heat transfer fluid
  • Thermal energy storage

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