Impacts from Deployment Barriers on the United States Wind Power Industry: Overview & Preliminary Findings (Presentation): NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

Research output: NRELPresentation

Abstract

Regardless of cost and performance some wind projects are unable to proceed to commissioning as a result of deployment barriers. Principal deployment barriers in the industry today include: wildlife, public acceptance, access to transmission, and radar. To date, methods for understanding these non-technical barriers have failed to accurately characterize the costs imposed by deployment barriersand the degree of impact to the industry. Analytical challenges include limited data and modeling capabilities. Changes in policy and regulation, among other factors, also add complexity to analysis of impacts from deployment barriers. This presentation details preliminary results from new NREL analysis focused on quantifying the impact of deployment barriers on the wind resource of the UnitedStates, the installed cost of wind projects, and the total electric power system cost of a 20% wind energy future. In terms of impacts to wind project costs and developable land, preliminary findings suggest that deployment barriers are secondary to market drivers such as demand. Nevertheless, impacts to wind project costs are on the order of $100/kW and a substantial share of the potentiallydevelopable windy land in the United States is indeed affected by deployment barriers.
Original languageAmerican English
Number of pages18
StatePublished - 2012

Publication series

NamePresented at the International Energy Agency (IEA) Wind: Task 28 Topical Expert Meeting, 15 June 2012, Biel, Switzerland

NREL Publication Number

  • NREL/PR-6A20-56155

Keywords

  • barriers
  • deployment
  • public acceptance
  • radar
  • transmission
  • wildlife
  • wind

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