Increased Ethylene Production by Overexpressing Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803

Jianping Yu, Claudia Durall, Pia Lindberg, Peter Lindbald

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

38 Scopus Citations

Abstract

Background: Cyanobacteria can be metabolically engineered to convert CO2 to fuels and chemicals such as ethylene. A major challenge in such efforts is to optimize carbon fixation and partition towards target molecules. Results: The efe gene encoding an ethylene-forming enzyme was introduced into a strain of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803 with increased phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPc) levels. The resulting engineered strain (CD-P) showed significantly increased ethylene production (10.5 ± 3.1 μg mL-1 OD-1 day-1) compared to the control strain (6.4 ± 1.4 μg mL-1 OD-1 day-1). Interestingly, extra copies of the native pepc or the heterologous expression of PEPc from the cyanobacterium Synechococcus PCC 7002 (Synechococcus) in the CD-P, increased ethylene production (19.2 ± 1.3 and 18.3 ± 3.3 μg mL-1 OD-1 day-1, respectively) when the cells were treated with the acetyl-CoA carboxylase inhibitor, cycloxydim. A heterologous expression of phosphoenolpyruvate synthase (PPSA) from Synechococcus in the CD-P also increased ethylene production (16.77 ± 4.48 μg mL-1 OD-1 day-1) showing differences in the regulation of the native and the PPSA from Synechococcus in Synechocystis. Conclusions: This work demonstrates that genetic rewiring of cyanobacterial central carbon metabolism can enhance carbon supply to the TCA cycle and thereby further increase ethylene production.

Original languageAmerican English
Article number16
Number of pages13
JournalBiotechnology for Biofuels
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2020

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 The Author(s).

NREL Publication Number

  • NREL/JA-2700-74702

Keywords

  • Acetyl-CoA
  • Cyanobacteria
  • Ethylene
  • Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPc)
  • Phosphoenolpyruvate synthase (PPSA)

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