Integration and Dissemination of Citizen Reported and Seismically Derived Earthquake Information via Social Network Technologies

Michelle Guy, Paul Earle, Chris Ostrum, Kenny Gruchalla, Scott Horvath

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

69 Scopus Citations

Abstract

People in the locality of earthquakes are publishing anecdotal information about the shaking within seconds of their occurrences via social network technologies, such as Twitter. In contrast, depending on the size and location of the earthquake, scientific alerts can take between two to twenty minutes to publish. We describe TED (Twitter Earthquake Detector) a system that adopts social network technologies to augment earthquake response products and the delivery of hazard information. The TED system analyzes data from these social networks for multiple purposes: 1) to integrate citizen reports of earthquakes with corresponding scientific reports 2) to infer the public level of interest in an earthquake for tailoring outputs disseminated via social network technologies and 3) to explore the possibility of rapid detection of a probable earthquake, within seconds of its occurrence, helping to fill the gap between the earthquake origin time and the presence of quantitative scientific data.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages42-53
Number of pages12
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010
Event9th International Symposium on Intelligent Data Analysis, IDA 2010 - Tucson, AZ, United States
Duration: 19 May 201021 May 2010

Conference

Conference9th International Symposium on Intelligent Data Analysis, IDA 2010
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityTucson, AZ
Period19/05/1021/05/10

NREL Publication Number

  • NREL/CP-2C0-48834

Keywords

  • Citizen reporting
  • Earthquake
  • Geospatial-temporal data
  • Hazard
  • Micro-blogging
  • Social network
  • Time series
  • Twitter

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