Investigation of the Impact of the Upstream Induction Zone on LIDAR Measurement Accuracy for Wind Turbine Control Applications using Large-Eddy Simulation

Matthew Churchfield, Eric Simley, Lucy Pao, Pieter Gebraad

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

28 Scopus Citations

Abstract

Several sources of error exist in lidar measurements for feedforward control of wind turbines including the ability to detect only radial velocities, spatial averaging, and wind evolution. This paper investigates another potential source of error: the upstream induction zone. The induction zone can directly affect lidar measurements and presents an opportunity for further decorrelation between upstream wind and the wind that interacts with the rotor. The impact of the induction zone is investigated using the combined CFD and aeroelastic code SOWFA. Lidar measurements are simulated upstream of a 5 MW turbine rotor and the true wind disturbances are found using a wind speed estimator and turbine outputs. Lidar performance in the absence of an induction zone is determined by simulating lidar measurements and the turbine response using the aeroelastic code FAST with wind inputs taken far upstream of the original turbine location in the SOWFA wind field. Results indicate that while measurement quality strongly depends on the amount of wind evolution, the induction zone has little effect. However, the optimal lidar preview distance and circular scan radius change slightly due to the presence of the induction zone.

Original languageAmerican English
Article numberArticle No. 012003
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Physics: Conference Series
Volume524
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
Event5th Science of Making Torque from Wind Conference, TORQUE 2014 - Copenhagen, Denmark
Duration: 18 Jun 201420 Jun 2014

NREL Publication Number

  • NREL/JA-5000-62480

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