Strong Internal and External Luminescence as Solar Cells Approach the Shockley-Queisser Limit

Owen D. Miller, Eli Yablonovitch, Sarah R. Kurtz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

823 Scopus Citations

Abstract

Absorbed sunlight in a solar cell produces electrons and holes. However, at the open-circuit condition, the carriers have no place to go. They build up in density, and ideally, they emit external luminescence that exactly balances the incoming sunlight. Any additional nonradiative recombination impairs the carrier density buildup, limiting the open-circuit voltage. At open circuit, efficient external luminescence is an indicator of low internal optical losses. Thus, efficient external luminescence is, counterintuitively, a necessity for approaching the Shockley-Queisser (SQ) efficiency limit. A great solar cell also needs to be a great light-emitting diode. Owing to the narrow escape cone for light, efficient external emission requires repeated attempts and demands an internal luminescence efficiency ≫90%.

Original languageAmerican English
Article number6213058
Pages (from-to)303-311
Number of pages9
JournalIEEE Journal of Photovoltaics
Volume2
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012

NREL Publication Number

  • NREL/JA-5200-55254

Keywords

  • External luminescence
  • GaAs
  • Shockley-Queisser (SQ) limit
  • solar cells

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